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Thread: Single 21 Female relocating from NY to Miami - where to live?

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    Default Single 21 Female relocating from NY to Miami - where to live?

    Hi everyone,

    I'm a recent college grad from NY and have worked a few months here in NY but am completely tired of NY and the high cost of living here and am looking to make a move to Miami. I'm hoping to get a few detailed suggestions about good areas to live.

    Ideally, I would like to live on South Beach but coming from NY, I am a new driver and would not have a car right away. I would need to get to work without a fairly long commute and would probably have to utilize public transportation in the beginning. With that said, living in SoBe is probably not the best scenario. I have been looking into the Brickell area but would like a little more info. I know this is the financial center but how is the nightlife here beside the usual after work happy hour. Is this a pedestrian friendly location for going to the grocery etc. I'm looking to spend around $1500/mo for rent.

    I have been looking into Coral Gables as well but I am hearing that the neighborhood is more family oriented ...any thoughts/suggestions are appreciated!
    Thanks!

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    Default Re: Single 21 Female relocating from NY to Miami - where to live?

    Hi and welcome to 411

    Well a lot depends on where you will be working. Do you have a job lined up for when you move? It is a lot better to live near where you work in Miami, as while public transport is good to get to the mall, it is harder to reply on it for a daily commute.

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    Editor Matt Meltzer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Single 21 Female relocating from NY to Miami - where to live?

    Unless you live in South Beach or MAYBE Brickell, you're going to need a car. And if you're sick of high cost of living, South Beach is not the place to be. Cheaper than Manhattan, sure. But not cheap by anyone's stretch. And our salaries here and a fraction of what they are in NYC. What do you expect to be making here? If you're using the 1/3 of your income guideline for rent, I'm not sure what job you'll have that you'll make $4500 a month after taxes. If you can swing that at 21, kudos.

    Brickell is ok. Very South American dominated, to the point that if you are not South American it's not very inclusive at all. There is a variety of nightlife, but again everyone there for the most part is SA. And if you are not, they're not particularly welcoming. I generally discourage Americans from moving there. The only upside is you can actually use the Metrorail if you live there.

    Midtown is really where I recommend most younger people go. It's new and clean and very young and urban. Great new bars and restaurants popping up there every day. Downside is its not really public transportation friendly.

    As Jess siad, you need to have a job lined up before you come here. I believe we have the third worst job market in America right now, and for some reason out population went UP. If you speak Spanish, you may be in a good spot. But the majority of hiring here goes on by who you know, not sending out resumes and the like. And if you're new in town, it's hard to know anyone. If you DO have a job lined up, live near where you work. A bad commute here will completely ruin the experience for you.

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    Default Re: Single 21 Female relocating from NY to Miami - where to live?

    I agree with Matt and Jess the public transportation here is nothing like in New York. It can be VERY unreliable. So biking/walking distance is AWESOME if you can. If not I think you should look for a cheaper place just to get your car quicker, that way you can also get a feel for the area before getting stuck in an expensive lease. Although Matt said Brickell can be less welcoming inf you are not hispanic. Well I have spent a lot of time in the Brickell area and I never really felt that. And I look very much not Hispanic. I enjoyed that area and it is very public transportation friendly.

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    Member Hoppie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Single 21 Female relocating from NY to Miami - where to live?

    Btw public transport. Last Sunday my family and I tried out the metrobus and the metrorail so that we know what we can and cannot do.

    We live in Country Walk so the 252 Coral Reef MAX rolls nearly next door, though it makes a silly loop and this causes the trip East-Northbound to be 15 minutes longer than South-Westbound. About 30 minutes to reach the crossing of US1 and 152nd St, and another 20 to go all the way up to the Southernmost metrorail station.

    When we compare this to travel times in the Netherlands, it matches nicely. The distance covered by the 252MAX is comparable to a typical village-to-downtown travel and 45-60 minutes isn't unexpected. Of course, busses always are slower than a car, with the frequent stops and the detours. The 252MAX goes all the way to the Zoo and back, both directions, which costs 10 minutes extra.

    The busses itself are pretty normal to European standards, though the use of a cord along the length of the bus to signal that you want to get out is really taking us 40 years back in time. Brilliant.

    The facility to pick up wheelchairs by a fully automatic ramp is unmatched. Never seen this before, though busses with lowered floors are common now.

    Ticket prices are low, low, low. $2 for such a trip is a steal. In Europe you pay $5 or more and that is only in pre-sale, not on the bus itself.

    Difference is that in Europe, you buy actual tickets, while on the Miami-Dade metrobus you pay $2 (in exact change or you simply lose the rest) and you get nothing in return. Therefore you cannot spend excess money on future rides, which is unexpected, but understandable. The whole system is simpler. Much simpler.

    Chip cards offer nice ways to travel cash-free. You check in and repeat the check in at every new vehicle you board, be it metrobus or metrorail. You do not check out (using your card to open the metrorail exit gate isn't checking out). There is no complex fee calculation done on distance traveled. It's just a flat boarding fee, and it is low, low, low. You can also load day tickets for the complete system ($5) or week tickets ($26) onto the same chip cards, and if you have these (on top of 'loose money' on the card), they will be used first. Easy.

    On the trip East-North, the bus driver basically refused to take our cash money because we travelled for the first time and planned to buy chip cards at the metrorail station, hence he offered us a free ride. He was exceptionally helpful after he parked his bus at the terminal to show us all ins and outs of the chipcard machine and tell us everything. Hats off.

    On a Sunday, the frequency of both metrobus and metrorail is rather low, so you need to plan properly, but the accuracy is good so you CAN plan. On weekdays it probably is all overboard but then the frequency is triple or even higher.

    Clean, no-graffiti vehicles (nice compared to many European systems) and pleasant stations (in daylight). No issues at all.

    We don't know whether it is all as nice and safe after dark, but this holds for each public transport system we have seen anyway.


    Dutchie
    rk likes this.

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    Editor Christy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Single 21 Female relocating from NY to Miami - where to live?

    As Jess siad, you need to have a job lined up before you come here. I believe we have the third worst job market in America right now, and for some reason out population went UP. If you speak Spanish, you may be in a good spot. But the majority of hiring here goes on by who you know, not sending out resumes and the like. And if you're new in town, it's hard to know anyone. If you DO have a job lined up, live near where you work. A bad commute here will completely ruin the experience for you.[/QUOTE

    I think you can have a corporate job lined up, but if you're just looking to work in the service industry or hospitality industry they usually hire on the spot.

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